Discussion:
[CM] the era of hackers is over
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RS Wood
2018-04-30 01:45:40 UTC
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From the «nice while it lasted» department:
Title: The Era of Hackers is Over
Author: janrinok
Date: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 09:54:00 -0400
Link: https://soylentnews.org/article.pl?sid=18/04/28/0726245&from=rss

fliptop[1] writes:

Over at ACM[2] Yegor Bugayenko writes[3]:

In the 1970s, when Microsoft and Apple were founded, programming was an art
only a limited group of dedicated enthusiasts actually knew how to perform
properly. CPUs were rather slow, personal computers had a very limited amount
of memory, and monitors were lo-res. To create something decent, a programmer
had to fight against actual hardware limitations.

In order to win in this war, programmers had to be both trained and talented
in computer science, a science that was at that time mostly about algorithms
and data structures.

[...] Most programmers were calling themselves "hackers," even though in the
early 1980s this word, according to Steven Levy's book Hackers: Heroes of the
Computer Revolution, "had acquired a specific and negative connotation."
Since the 1990s, this label has become "a shibboleth that identifies one as a
member of the tribe," as linguist Geoff Nunberg pointed out[4].

[...] it would appear that the skills required of professional and successful
programmers are drastically different from the ones needed back in the 1990s.
The profession now requires less mathematics and algorithms and instead
emphasizes more skills under the umbrella term "sociotech." Susan Long
illustrates in her book Socioanalytic Methods: Discovering the Hidden in
Organizations and Social Systems that the term "sociotechnical systems" was
coined by [5]Eric Trist[6] et al. in the World War II era based on their work
with English coal miners at the Tavistock Institute in London. The term now
seems more suitable to the new skills and techniques modern programmers need.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Original Submission[7]

Read more of this story[8] at SoylentNews.

Links:
[1]: http://soylentnews.org/~fliptop/ (link)
[2]: http://www.acm.org/ (link)
[3]: https://cacm.acm.org/blogs/blog-cacm/227154-the-era-of-hackers-is-over/fulltext (link)
[4]: https://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2014/01/16/263088398/hackers-techies-what-to-call-san-franciscos-newcomers (link)
[5]: http://us.karnacbooks.com/product/socioanalytic-methods-discovering-the-hidden-in-organisations-and-social-systems/33236/ (link)
[6]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Trist (link)
[7]: http://soylentnews.org/submit.pl?op=viewsub&subid=26270 (link)
[8]: https://soylentnews.org/article.pl?sid=18/04/28/0726245&from=rss (link)
Big Bad Bob
2018-05-02 18:41:13 UTC
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Post by RS Wood
Title: The Era of Hackers is Over
Author: janrinok
Date: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 09:54:00 -0400
Link: https://soylentnews.org/article.pl?sid=18/04/28/0726245&from=rss
<snip>
Post by RS Wood
[...] it would appear that the skills required of professional and successful
programmers are drastically different from the ones needed back in the 1990s.
The profession now requires less mathematics and algorithms and instead
emphasizes more skills under the umbrella term "sociotech."
ew, my lunch is coming up now... (it tastes like 'feel')

yeah I know it's the opinion of the article-writer, but I couldn't
disagree MORE. It sounds like an EXCUSE by 'education' institutions to
INDOCTRINATE engineers into their touchy-feely-snowflake-safe_space
mentality.

Maybe there's a REAL advantage to:
a) being treated like an OUTCAST because of your 'geekiness';
b) learning to FIGHT BACK using your inherent talents;
c) becoming a stand-alone powerhouse and NOT needing others to get
things done

Yeah, that would be 'old school' hackers. If I read that article
snippet correctly, the new bunch who thinks they're 'hackers' aren't
'hackers' at all. They're too willing to go along with the crowd. That
would be the #1 indicator that they're NOT hackers, because [as the
Jargon file would point out], a hacker is known for UNCONVENTIONAL (and
usually highly creative) solutions to problems.
Huge
2018-05-02 21:25:05 UTC
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Post by Big Bad Bob
Post by RS Wood
Title: The Era of Hackers is Over
Author: janrinok
Date: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 09:54:00 -0400
Link: https://soylentnews.org/article.pl?sid=18/04/28/0726245&from=rss
<snip>
Post by RS Wood
[...] it would appear that the skills required of professional and successful
programmers are drastically different from the ones needed back in the 1990s.
The profession now requires less mathematics and algorithms and instead
emphasizes more skills under the umbrella term "sociotech."
ew, my lunch is coming up now... (it tastes like 'feel')
[17 lines snipped]

The source article is here;

https://cacm.acm.org/blogs/blog-cacm/227154-the-era-of-hackers-is-over/fulltext

"They ["new age" programmers (my term)] need to know how to communicate
with the open source community to find the needed components, to request
features, and to learn bug fixes from their developers."

These people are not programmers. They are just a slightly better class
of luser.
--
Today is Boomtime, the 49th day of Discord in the YOLD 3184
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