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[Link Posting] Computer Space and the Dawn of the Arcade Video Game
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Rich
2018-06-03 05:32:10 UTC
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<URL:https://www.technologizer.com/2011/12/11/computer-space-and-the-daw
n-of-the-arcade-video-game/>
Forty years ago, Nutting Associates released the world's first
mass-produced and commercially sold video game, Computer Space. It was
the brainchild of Nolan Bushnell, a charismatic engineer with a creative
vision matched only by his skill at self-promotion. With the help of his
business partner Ted Dabney and the staff of Nutting Associates,
Bushnell pushed the game from nothing into reality only two short years
after conceiving the idea.
Computer Space pitted a player-controlled rocket ship against two
machine-controlled flying saucers in a space simulation set before a
two-dimensional star field. The player controlled the rocket with four
buttons: one for fire, which shoots a missile from the front of the
rocket ship; two directional rotation buttons (to rotate the ship
orientation clockwise or counterclockwise); and one for thrust, which
propelled the ship in whichever direction it happened to be pointing.
Think of Asteroids without the asteroids, and you should get the
picture.
During play, two saucers would appear on the screen and shoot at the
player while flying in a zig-zag formation. The player's goal was to
dodge the saucer fire and shoot the saucers.
Considering a game of this complexity playing out on a TV set, you might
think that it was created as a sophisticated piece of software running
on a computer. You'd think it, but you'd be wrong?and Bushnell wouldn't
blame you for the mistake. How he and Dabney managed to pull it off is a
story of audacity, tenacity, and sheer force-of-will worthy of tech
legend. This is how it happened.
...
Computer Nerd Kev
2018-06-09 00:51:16 UTC
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Post by Rich
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# ATTENTION: This post is a reference to a website. The poster of #
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<URL:https://www.technologizer.com/2011/12/11/computer-space-and-the-daw
n-of-the-arcade-video-game/>
Forty years ago, Nutting Associates released the world's first
mass-produced and commercially sold video game, Computer Space. It was
the brainchild of Nolan Bushnell, a charismatic engineer with a creative
vision matched only by his skill at self-promotion. With the help of his
business partner Ted Dabney and the staff of Nutting Associates,
Bushnell pushed the game from nothing into reality only two short years
after conceiving the idea.
Interesting article.

Even more forgotten are the engineers who later designed DIY
versions of arcade machines in the 70s and 80s that could be
built to work with home TV sets, while restrained by the
practical component cost to readers of the hobby electronics
magazines that they published in.

Also, a bit of movie trivia: Computer Space made an appearance
in the Sci-Fi film Soylent Green (even showed a bit of gameplay
if I remember correctly) in what Wikipedia now tells me "is
considered to be the first video game appearance in a movie".
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Nomen Nescio
2018-06-09 02:01:54 UTC
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https://duckduckgo.com/html/?q=9780985597405
RS Wood
2018-06-11 21:03:13 UTC
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On Sat, 09 Jun 2018 02:01:54 -0000
Post by Nomen Nescio
https://duckduckgo.com/html/?q=9780985597405
Looks like an interesting subject, but that book gets some scathingly
bad reviews. Looks like a pretty amateur production.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17177947-atari-inc#
Nomen Nescio
2018-06-12 15:12:28 UTC
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Post by RS Wood
On Sat, 09 Jun 2018 02:01:54 -0000
Post by Nomen Nescio
https://duckduckgo.com/html/?q=9780985597405
Looks like an interesting subject, but that book gets some scathingly
bad reviews. Looks like a pretty amateur production.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17177947-atari-inc#
It's not great literature, it's great history. Its photos and stories
(regardless of how poorly written) awaken my memories of working in the
electronics industry, as it once existed, in a Midwest city during the
1970s. https://duckduckgo.com/html/?q=1566640237 affects me in the same
way.

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