Discussion:
Winamp
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RS Wood
2017-07-03 17:26:26 UTC
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https://arstechnica.com/business/2017/07/winamp-how-greatest-mp3-player-undid-itself/

MP3s are so natural to the Internet now that it’s almost hard to
imagine a time before high-quality compressed music. But there was such
a time—and even after "MP3" entered the mainstream, organizing,
ripping, and playing back one's music collection remained a clunky and
frustrating experience.

Enter Winamp, the skin-able, customizable MP3 player that "really whips
the llama's ass." In the late 1990s, every music geek had a copy;
llama-whipping had gone global, and the big-money acquisition offers
quickly followed. AOL famously acquired the company in June 1999 for
$80-$100 million—and Winamp almost immediately lost its innovative edge.

Winamp's 15-year anniversary is now upon us, with little fanfare. It’s
almost as if the Internet has forgotten about the upstart with the odd
slogan that looked at one time like it would be the company to
revolutionize digital music. It certainly had the opportunity.

“There's no reason that Winamp couldn’t be in the position that iTunes
is in today if not for a few layers of mismanagement by AOL that
started immediately upon acquisition,” Rob Lord, the first general
manager of Winamp, and its first-ever hire, told Ars. Further Reading
“Oprah” for indie bands: Apple once loved unknown acts—what changed?

Justin Frankel, Winamp's primary developer, seems to concur in an
interview he gave to BetaNews. (He declined to be interviewed for this
article.) “I'm always hoping that they will come around and realize
that they're killing [Winamp] and find a better way, but AOL always
seems too bogged down with all of their internal politics to get
anything done,” he said.
--
RS Wood <***@therandymon.com>
Shadow
2017-07-03 23:03:28 UTC
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Post by RS Wood
https://arstechnica.com/business/2017/07/winamp-how-greatest-mp3-player-undid-itself/
MP3s are so natural to the Internet now that it’s almost hard to
imagine a time before high-quality compressed music. But there was such
a time—and even after "MP3" entered the mainstream, organizing,
ripping, and playing back one's music collection remained a clunky and
frustrating experience.
Enter Winamp, the skin-able, customizable MP3 player that "really whips
the llama's ass." In the late 1990s, every music geek had a copy;
llama-whipping had gone global, and the big-money acquisition offers
quickly followed. AOL famously acquired the company in June 1999 for
$80-$100 million—and Winamp almost immediately lost its innovative edge.
Winamp's 15-year anniversary is now upon us, with little fanfare. It’s
almost as if the Internet has forgotten about the upstart with the odd
slogan that looked at one time like it would be the company to
revolutionize digital music. It certainly had the opportunity.
“There's no reason that Winamp couldn’t be in the position that iTunes
is in today if not for a few layers of mismanagement by AOL that
started immediately upon acquisition,” Rob Lord, the first general
manager of Winamp, and its first-ever hire, told Ars. Further Reading
“Oprah” for indie bands: Apple once loved unknown acts—what changed?
Justin Frankel, Winamp's primary developer, seems to concur in an
interview he gave to BetaNews. (He declined to be interviewed for this
article.) “I'm always hoping that they will come around and realize
that they're killing [Winamp] and find a better way, but AOL always
seems too bogged down with all of their internal politics to get
anything done,” he said.
Amazing how little Winamp changed from version 2.95 (2003) to
5.666 (2013). If you delete the unwanted tracking plugins, the only
difference is size. 600k to 4.5MB for the installer for "lite"
versions.
Still my favorite music player.
[]'s

PS Most are here:
http://www.oldapps.com/winamp.php
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
Dan Espen
2017-07-03 23:12:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Shadow
Post by RS Wood
https://arstechnica.com/business/2017/07/winamp-how-greatest-mp3-player-undid-itself/
MP3s are so natural to the Internet now that it’s almost hard to
imagine a time before high-quality compressed music. But there was such
a time—and even after "MP3" entered the mainstream, organizing,
ripping, and playing back one's music collection remained a clunky and
frustrating experience.
Enter Winamp, the skin-able, customizable MP3 player that "really whips
the llama's ass." In the late 1990s, every music geek had a copy;
llama-whipping had gone global, and the big-money acquisition offers
quickly followed. AOL famously acquired the company in June 1999 for
$80-$100 million—and Winamp almost immediately lost its innovative edge.
Winamp's 15-year anniversary is now upon us, with little fanfare. It’s
almost as if the Internet has forgotten about the upstart with the odd
slogan that looked at one time like it would be the company to
revolutionize digital music. It certainly had the opportunity.
“There's no reason that Winamp couldn’t be in the position that iTunes
is in today if not for a few layers of mismanagement by AOL that
started immediately upon acquisition,” Rob Lord, the first general
manager of Winamp, and its first-ever hire, told Ars. Further Reading
“Oprah” for indie bands: Apple once loved unknown acts—what changed?
Justin Frankel, Winamp's primary developer, seems to concur in an
interview he gave to BetaNews. (He declined to be interviewed for this
article.) “I'm always hoping that they will come around and realize
that they're killing [Winamp] and find a better way, but AOL always
seems too bogged down with all of their internal politics to get
anything done,” he said.
Amazing how little Winamp changed from version 2.95 (2003) to
5.666 (2013). If you delete the unwanted tracking plugins, the only
difference is size. 600k to 4.5MB for the installer for "lite"
versions.
Still my favorite music player.
[]'s
http://www.oldapps.com/winamp.php
BAH!

Using xmms2 here.
No GUI needed or wanted.

Mostly play rips of my own vinyl collection.
6000 tracks of flac.
--
Dan Espen
Huge
2017-07-04 09:41:45 UTC
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Raw Message
[41 lines snipped]
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Shadow
http://www.oldapps.com/winamp.php
BAH!
Using xmms2 here.
No GUI needed or wanted.
The thing that pisses me off about most GUI MP3 players is that they
choose to emulate possibly the worst UI in the whole universe; a car
stereo. (I can't try the above - no Windows here). In Ghod's name, why?

FWIW, after many false starts, I use Exaile.
--
Today is Setting Orange, the 39th day of Confusion in the YOLD 3183
I don't have an attitude problem.
If you have a problem with my attitude, that's your problem.
Rich
2017-07-04 13:11:36 UTC
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Post by Huge
[41 lines snipped]
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Shadow
http://www.oldapps.com/winamp.php
BAH!
Using xmms2 here.
No GUI needed or wanted.
The thing that pisses me off about most GUI MP3 players is that they
choose to emulate possibly the worst UI in the whole universe; a car
stereo. (I can't try the above - no Windows here). In Ghod's name, why?
FWIW, after many false starts, I use Exaile.
Seven pages of skins starting here:
http://gqmpeg.sourceforge.net/mpeg-skin1.html

Some of which do emulate a car stereo, but not all do.

And, if you are so inclined, you can create your own custom skin.

Main page:
http://gqmpeg.sourceforge.net/index.html

gqmpeg is just a UI on top of mpg123 to actually perform playback.
RS Wood
2017-07-04 23:12:29 UTC
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Raw Message
On 4 Jul 2017 09:41:45 GMT
Post by Huge
The thing that pisses me off about most GUI MP3 players is that they
choose to emulate possibly the worst UI in the whole universe; a car
stereo. (I can't try the above - no Windows here). In Ghod's name, why?
FWIW, after many false starts, I use Exaile.
I quite like Clementine. Works well with the repository I keep on a
NAS.

Shadow
2017-07-04 11:33:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Shadow
Amazing how little Winamp changed from version 2.95 (2003) to
5.666 (2013). If you delete the unwanted tracking plugins, the only
difference is size. 600k to 4.5MB for the installer for "lite"
versions.
Still my favorite music player.
[]'s
http://www.oldapps.com/winamp.php
BAH!
Using xmms2 here.
No GUI needed or wanted.
Mostly play rips of my own vinyl collection.
6000 tracks of flac.
What I liked most about xmms2 was it's Winamp-like gui. When
it was no longer developed, I went over to Audacious. (Linux)
But under Windows, Winamp still RuLeZ.
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
Dan Espen
2017-07-04 12:59:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Shadow
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Shadow
Amazing how little Winamp changed from version 2.95 (2003) to
5.666 (2013). If you delete the unwanted tracking plugins, the only
difference is size. 600k to 4.5MB for the installer for "lite"
versions.
Still my favorite music player.
[]'s
http://www.oldapps.com/winamp.php
BAH!
Using xmms2 here.
No GUI needed or wanted.
Mostly play rips of my own vinyl collection.
6000 tracks of flac.
What I liked most about xmms2 was it's Winamp-like gui. When
it was no longer developed, I went over to Audacious. (Linux)
I think you mean xmms, not xmms2.
There are xmms2 clients that provide a GUI, but so far,
I haven't felt the need:

https://xmms2.org/wiki/Client:Promoe
Post by Shadow
But under Windows, Winamp still RuLeZ.
[]'s
Linux is loaded with music players that go from minimal to oh my
goodness. All I really wanted is a music player that stops and
starts on arbitrary keyboard shortcuts.

They all seem to do that.

I don't have a multimedia keyboard so I toggle play with
Shift-Pause.
--
Dan Espen
Shadow
2017-07-04 16:48:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Shadow
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Shadow
Amazing how little Winamp changed from version 2.95 (2003) to
5.666 (2013). If you delete the unwanted tracking plugins, the only
difference is size. 600k to 4.5MB for the installer for "lite"
versions.
Still my favorite music player.
[]'s
http://www.oldapps.com/winamp.php
BAH!
Using xmms2 here.
No GUI needed or wanted.
Mostly play rips of my own vinyl collection.
6000 tracks of flac.
What I liked most about xmms2 was it's Winamp-like gui. When
it was no longer developed, I went over to Audacious. (Linux)
I think you mean xmms, not xmms2.
There are xmms2 clients that provide a GUI, but so far,
https://xmms2.org/wiki/Client:Promoe
You are right, I probably installed the GUI from the repo
without thinking too much about it.
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Shadow
But under Windows, Winamp still RuLeZ.
Linux is loaded with music players that go from minimal to oh my
goodness. All I really wanted is a music player that stops and
starts on arbitrary keyboard shortcuts.
They all seem to do that.
I don't have a multimedia keyboard so I toggle play with
Shift-Pause.
I used this

http://www.mp3blaster.org/

When I only had a console.
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
Ant
2017-07-04 00:56:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I still use Winamp in Windows!
Post by RS Wood
https://arstechnica.com/business/2017/07/winamp-how-greatest-mp3-player-undid-itself/
MP3s are so natural to the Internet now that it???s almost hard to
imagine a time before high-quality compressed music. But there was such
a time???and even after "MP3" entered the mainstream, organizing,
ripping, and playing back one's music collection remained a clunky and
frustrating experience.
Enter Winamp, the skin-able, customizable MP3 player that "really whips
the llama's ass." In the late 1990s, every music geek had a copy;
llama-whipping had gone global, and the big-money acquisition offers
quickly followed. AOL famously acquired the company in June 1999 for
$80-$100 million???and Winamp almost immediately lost its innovative edge.
Winamp's 15-year anniversary is now upon us, with little fanfare. It???s
almost as if the Internet has forgotten about the upstart with the odd
slogan that looked at one time like it would be the company to
revolutionize digital music. It certainly had the opportunity.
???There's no reason that Winamp couldn???t be in the position that iTunes
is in today if not for a few layers of mismanagement by AOL that
started immediately upon acquisition,??? Rob Lord, the first general
manager of Winamp, and its first-ever hire, told Ars. Further Reading
???Oprah??? for indie bands: Apple once loved unknown acts???what changed?
Justin Frankel, Winamp's primary developer, seems to concur in an
interview he gave to BetaNews. (He declined to be interviewed for this
article.) ???I'm always hoping that they will come around and realize
that they're killing [Winamp] and find a better way, but AOL always
seems too bogged down with all of their internal politics to get
anything done,??? he said.
--
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