Discussion:
[CM] the PiDP-8/I - a PDP-8 replica on Raspberry Pi
Add Reply
RS Wood
2017-07-15 23:57:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
From the «but can I read NetNews on it?» department:
Title: PiDP-8/I: a modern replica of the 1968 PDP-8/I
Author: Thom Holwerda
Date: Tue, 11 Jul 2017 19:12:59 -0400
Link: http://osnews.com/story/29915/PiDP-8_I_a_modern_replica_of_the_1968_PDP-8_I

Now this is a real treat - over the past few years, Christopher Masto has been
building (and where possible, selling) a PDP-8 replica called the PiDP-8/I. As
you may have guessed from the name, the core of the PiDP-8/I is a Raspberry Pi,
complemented by a replica PDP-8 front panel and case. From a hardware
perspective, the PiDP is just a frontpanel for a Raspberry PI. In the hardware
section below, the technical details of the front panel are explained. In fact,
the front panel could just as easily be driven by any microcontroller, it only
lights the leds and scans the switch positions. From a software perspective,
the PiDP is just a Raspberry Pi, running Raspbian, which automatically logs in
to the SimH emulator. SimH is modified to drive the front panel - meaning it
has instructions added to reflect the state of the PDP-8 CPU registers through
the leds, and responds to the switch settings. The PiDP is fully open source,
so you can download the schematics, design files, and software and build it
yourself from scratch. You can also order a kit from Christopher Masto for
$145, or pay an additional $170 for an assembled version (but isn't building
half the fun?). He has a few great videos of the PiDP up on his YouTube
channel, including a 90 minute build video and a tour and demo video.
Johnny Billquist
2017-07-16 01:43:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RS Wood
Title: PiDP-8/I: a modern replica of the 1968 PDP-8/I
Author: Thom Holwerda
Date: Tue, 11 Jul 2017 19:12:59 -0400
Link: http://osnews.com/story/29915/PiDP-8_I_a_modern_replica_of_the_1968_PDP-8_I
Now this is a real treat - over the past few years, Christopher Masto has been
building (and where possible, selling) a PDP-8 replica called the PiDP-8/I. As
you may have guessed from the name, the core of the PiDP-8/I is a Raspberry Pi,
complemented by a replica PDP-8 front panel and case. From a hardware
perspective, the PiDP is just a frontpanel for a Raspberry PI. In the hardware
section below, the technical details of the front panel are explained. In fact,
the front panel could just as easily be driven by any microcontroller, it only
lights the leds and scans the switch positions. From a software perspective,
the PiDP is just a Raspberry Pi, running Raspbian, which automatically logs in
to the SimH emulator. SimH is modified to drive the front panel - meaning it
has instructions added to reflect the state of the PDP-8 CPU registers through
the leds, and responds to the switch settings. The PiDP is fully open source,
so you can download the schematics, design files, and software and build it
yourself from scratch. You can also order a kit from Christopher Masto for
$145, or pay an additional $170 for an assembled version (but isn't building
half the fun?). He has a few great videos of the PiDP up on his YouTube
channel, including a 90 minute build video and a tour and demo video.
Uh. Nitpick, but the guy making these kits is Oscar Vermeulen, and not
Christopher Masto, unless he's setup a parallell production...

Johnny
--
Johnny Billquist || "I'm on a bus
|| on a psychedelic trip
email: ***@softjar.se || Reading murder books
pdp is alive! || tryin' to stay hip" - B. Idol
Bob Eager
2017-07-16 23:01:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Title: PiDP-8/I: a modern replica of the 1968 PDP-8/I Author: Thom
http://osnews.com/story/29915/
PiDP-8_I_a_modern_replica_of_the_1968_PDP-8_I
Now this is a real treat - over the past few years, Christopher Masto
has been building (and where possible, selling) a PDP-8 replica called
the PiDP-8/I. As you may have guessed from the name, the core of the
PiDP-8/I is a Raspberry Pi, complemented by a replica PDP-8 front panel
and case. From a hardware perspective, the PiDP is just a frontpanel for
a Raspberry PI. In the hardware section below, the technical details of
the front panel are explained. In fact, the front panel could just as
easily be driven by any microcontroller, it only lights the leds and
scans the switch positions. From a software perspective,
the PiDP is just a Raspberry Pi, running Raspbian, which automatically
logs in to the SimH emulator. SimH is modified to drive the front panel
- meaning it has instructions added to reflect the state of the PDP-8
CPU registers through the leds, and responds to the switch settings. The
PiDP is fully open source,
so you can download the schematics, design files, and software and build
it yourself from scratch. You can also order a kit from Christopher
Masto for $145, or pay an additional $170 for an assembled version (but
isn't building half the fun?). He has a few great videos of the PiDP up
on his YouTube channel, including a 90 minute build video and a tour and
demo video.
Not Christopher, but Oscar Vermeulen. I have one of the kits - they are
very nice and good value.

I am currently refitting my workshop and then I will build it!

(I already have two SBC-6120s)
RS Wood
2017-07-17 13:52:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On 16 Jul 2017 23:01:44 GMT
Post by RS Wood
Title: PiDP-8/I: a modern replica of the 1968 PDP-8/I Author: Thom
http://osnews.com/story/29915/
PiDP-8_I_a_modern_replica_of_the_1968_PDP-8_I
The more I read about this project, the more I like it.
http://obsolescence.wixsite.com/obsolescence/pidp-8

Love the photos of the register bank and amber monitor, all connected
by a modern Lenovo laptop. What a cool project.
Johnny Billquist
2017-07-17 20:56:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RS Wood
On 16 Jul 2017 23:01:44 GMT
Post by RS Wood
Title: PiDP-8/I: a modern replica of the 1968 PDP-8/I Author: Thom
http://osnews.com/story/29915/
PiDP-8_I_a_modern_replica_of_the_1968_PDP-8_I
The more I read about this project, the more I like it.
http://obsolescence.wixsite.com/obsolescence/pidp-8
Love the photos of the register bank and amber monitor, all connected
by a modern Lenovo laptop. What a cool project.
It is a really cool system, and it works nicely. I've met Oscar and
played with one of these over the front panel. I'm a bit unsure about
one or two details of the front panel interaction, but in general it
works very nice, and it looks beautiful. If anyone is interested in
PDP-8 systems, this is probably the thing I'd recommend if they don't
have a real machine.

Oscar is also working on a similar thing for a PDP-11/70, which I found
even more fun to play with (but then again, I've been working more on
PDP-11 machines the last 25 years...)

Johnny
--
Johnny Billquist || "I'm on a bus
|| on a psychedelic trip
email: ***@softjar.se || Reading murder books
pdp is alive! || tryin' to stay hip" - B. Idol
Bob Eager
2017-07-17 21:38:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Johnny Billquist
Post by RS Wood
Post by RS Wood
Title: PiDP-8/I: a modern replica of the 1968 PDP-8/I Author: Thom
http://osnews.com/story/29915/
PiDP-8_I_a_modern_replica_of_the_1968_PDP-8_I
The more I read about this project, the more I like it.
http://obsolescence.wixsite.com/obsolescence/pidp-8
Love the photos of the register bank and amber monitor, all connected
by a modern Lenovo laptop. What a cool project.
It is a really cool system, and it works nicely. I've met Oscar and
played with one of these over the front panel. I'm a bit unsure about
one or two details of the front panel interaction, but in general it
works very nice, and it looks beautiful. If anyone is interested in
PDP-8 systems, this is probably the thing I'd recommend if they don't
have a real machine.
Just for fun, here's a picture of my SBC-6120:

Loading Image...

I must get on with the PiDP-8.
Lars Brinkhoff
2017-07-18 09:04:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Johnny Billquist
Oscar is also working on a similar thing for a PDP-11/70, which I
found even more fun to play with (but then again, I've been working
more on PDP-11 machines the last 25 years...)
It would also be nice if there were replicas of teletypes, terminals,
Dennis Ritche, etc.
mm0fmf
2017-07-18 18:00:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Johnny Billquist
Oscar is also working on a similar thing for a PDP-11/70
/me goes giddy at the thought. Want one!

PDP8 was the first computer I programmed in 1974. Is it really 43 years
ago. :-(

Loading...