Discussion:
[Link Posting] The MOnSter 6502
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Rich
2018-09-13 01:09:15 UTC
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<URL:https://monster6502.com/>
A dis-integrated circuit project to make a complete, working
transistor-scale replica of the classic MOS 6502 microprocessor.
FAQ
Sixty-Five-Oh-What?
The 6502 is the famous processor found at the core of such influential
computer systems as the Apple ][, the Commodore PET, the Atari 400 and
800 home video game consoles, the BBC Micro, and the Tamagotchi digital
pet. Slight variations of it were found in the Commodore 64, the Atari
2600, and the original Nintendo Entertainment System.
...
David Solimano
2018-09-13 04:57:06 UTC
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Post by Rich
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# this Usenet article is not the author of the referenced website. #
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<URL:https://monster6502.com/>
A dis-integrated circuit project to make a complete, working
transistor-scale replica of the classic MOS 6502 microprocessor.
FAQ
Sixty-Five-Oh-What?
The 6502 is the famous processor found at the core of such influential
computer systems as the Apple ][, the Commodore PET, the Atari 400 and
800 home video game consoles, the BBC Micro, and the Tamagotchi digital
pet. Slight variations of it were found in the Commodore 64, the Atari
2600, and the original Nintendo Entertainment System.
...
Saw that on YouTube earlier today, looks beautiful. I wonder how big
a 486 would be . . . and how slow.
--
David Solimano
***@solimano.org
Rich
2018-09-13 11:10:06 UTC
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Post by David Solimano
Post by Rich
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# ATTENTION: This post is a reference to a website. The poster of #
# this Usenet article is not the author of the referenced website. #
####################################################################
<URL:https://monster6502.com/>
A dis-integrated circuit project to make a complete, working
transistor-scale replica of the classic MOS 6502 microprocessor.
FAQ
Sixty-Five-Oh-What?
The 6502 is the famous processor found at the core of such influential
computer systems as the Apple ][, the Commodore PET, the Atari 400 and
800 home video game consoles, the BBC Micro, and the Tamagotchi digital
pet. Slight variations of it were found in the Commodore 64, the Atari
2600, and the original Nintendo Entertainment System.
...
Saw that on YouTube earlier today, looks beautiful. I wonder how big
a 486 would be . . . and how slow.
They address a similar question in their FAQ list at the bottom of the
page.

How big would a modern CPU be at this scale?

The Apple A8X, found in the iPad Air 2, contains about 3 billion
transistors. (This is comparable to the number of transistors in
modern desktop computer CPUs as well.) At the scale of the MOnSter
6502, that would take about 885,000 square feet (over 20 acres or 8
hectares) -- an area about 940 ft (286 m) square.

So, not for a 486, but a 486 would fall somewhere substantially larger
than the 6502 board, but somewhat smaller than 20 acres.
Adrian Caspersz
2018-09-13 15:28:08 UTC
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Post by Rich
<URL:https://monster6502.com/>
The 6502 is the famous processor found at the core of such influential
computer systems as the Apple ][, the Commodore PET, the Atari 400 and
800 home video game consoles, the BBC Micro, and the Tamagotchi digital
pet. Slight variations of it were found in the Commodore 64, the Atari
2600, and the original Nintendo Entertainment System.
...
I've got a great idea for a city park (either ornamental, residential or
business buildings) laid out so it looks above like an 8-bit
microprocessor...

Anyone got some land cheap and zillions of spare bricks?
--
Adrian C
Michael Black
2018-09-13 18:16:07 UTC
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Post by Rich
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# ATTENTION: This post is a reference to a website. The poster of #
# this Usenet article is not the author of the referenced website. #
####################################################################
<URL:https://monster6502.com/>
A dis-integrated circuit project to make a complete, working
transistor-scale replica of the classic MOS 6502 microprocessor.
And you can still get it as an IC, so what's the point?

There was a time when people built computers. There was a whole Amateur
Cmoputer SOciety, I think it was called something else, that existed
before microprocessors. Some were fixing up old computers, but some built
from scratch. WIth transistors, not much complexity, but when logic ICs
came along, they could be more impressive. Roger Amidon built one he
called "the Spider", it was on the cover of Byte in 1977, I forget the
month. It was built in the air, no circuit boards, kind of interesting.

I got interested in having my own computer, and maybe electronics (I can't
remember which came first) on seeing an article in a magazine about two
kids who'd built their own computer, in 68 or 69. Impressive at the tiem
since I was only 8 or 9, I wanted a computer from that point on. It was
much later that I realized their computer was probably simple, maybe one
of those kits made with paperclips and such.

Long forgotten, the November 1972 issue of 73 Magazine, a ham magazine,
had an article about building a computer. But it was an idea article, not
a construction article, mapping out what was needed, so it was a change
from the simple construction articles that had been seen previously.

But it was right on the cusp, within two years there were microprocessor
based computers in kit form, and the notion of building from scratch
mostly disappeared. "Building computers" became wiring up a
microprocessor, and then later assemblying boards.

Sure it takes effort to recreate the 6502, but it's already been done.
Why not actually build something unique, showing an interest in what would
make a good cpu?

But in the Maker world, we are supposed to be in awe of such things, and
not question the value.

Michael
Eli the Bearded
2018-09-13 19:30:35 UTC
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Post by Michael Black
Sure it takes effort to recreate the 6502, but it's already been done.
Why not actually build something unique, showing an interest in what would
make a good cpu?
But in the Maker world, we are supposed to be in awe of such things, and
not question the value.
In "the Maker world" you are free to build a your own unique, "good" CPU
out of individual transisters, too. What have you built?

Elijah
------
has never gotten a circuit board he designed to work
Computer Nerd Kev
2018-09-13 23:38:44 UTC
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Post by Michael Black
Sure it takes effort to recreate the 6502, but it's already been done.
Why not actually build something unique, showing an interest in what would
make a good cpu?
There are many examples of completely DIY CPU architectures online, eg:
http://www.timefracture.org/D16.html
http://homebrewcpu.com/

As well as new computer designs using old CPUs:
https://retrobrewcomputers.org/doku.php
Post by Michael Black
But in the Maker world, we are supposed to be in awe of such things, and
not question the value.
The trouble is that when everything has to have a described "value",
it risks becoming more like work than a hobby. The fun is to find a
goal, and achieve it. Maybe that goal looks like it will have some
benefit to humanity, or maybe it seems entirely pointless, but if
achieving it makes the individual/s involved happy, then it's
valid for that reason alone.

Sometimes the goals that at first look pointless actually evolve
into something more beneficial in the end than some that try to
be "valuable" from the beginning.
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